If you are a non-EEA national (including British) and wish to stay in Spain for longer than 90 days, you will need a visa. You should apply for the visa that suits your purpose from a Spanish Consulate in your home country.

When your visa application is approved and you have the visa stamp in your passport, you may travel to Spain to apply for a residence permit.

In this section, we list all the main types of visa available to non-EEA nationals and the requirements for each one.

See this page for more information on short-stay visa options in Spain.

Table Of Contents

Employment Visa

If you’re a non-EEA national and are offered an employment position in Spain, you need to apply for an employment visa. This process takes place in conjunction with the favourable answer to your future employer’s application for authorisation.

If your employment is for a fixed term only, you should apply for the Employment Visa with Fixed-term Contract.

When should I apply for an employment visa in Spain?

Once your future employer has received a favourable answer to the request to employ you (known as the autorización de residencia y trabajo por cuenta ajena in Spanish), you have one calendar month to apply for the visa. You should also apply for your visa within 90 days of the date you plan to enter Spain.

What documents do I need to apply for a work visa?

  • The completed visa form. You can download a copy here.
  • A recent passport photograph with white background.
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit in the country you live in. Plus photocopy.
  • Copy of the authorisation for you to work and live in Spain (autorización de residencia y trabajo por cuenta ajena).
  • Copy of the employment contract submitted when the above authorisation was granted. The contract must carry the Immigration Office stamp.
  • Certificate of criminal record* issued in the country or countries where you have lived for the last five years. The certificate must be no more than three months old.
  • Medical certificate* issued no later than three months before you apply for your visa stating that you have no diseases that may have serious health repercussions in accordance with 2005 International Health Regulations.

* Certificates must be translated into Spanish (sworn translation) and carry the Hague Apostille or be legalised the Spanish consulate (except documents issued by Spain, which will not require to be legalised).

What happens after I get my Spanish work visa?

You must enter Spain within one month and then you have one month from the date of entry to apply for your residence permit (TIE/ Tarjeta de Identidad de Extranjero) at the Immigration Office or Police Station in the area you live.

Employment Visa with a Fixed-term Contract

If you are a non-EEA national and have accepted a job offer in Spain with a fixed term of employment, you need to apply for a work visa with fixed-term contract. Note that to apply for this visa you need a favourable answer to your employer’s request for you to live and work in Spain on a fixed-term contract. This is known as autorización de residencia y trabajo por cuenta ajena de duración determinada in Spanish.

When should I apply for this visa?

You should start your visa application within one month of getting authorisation to live and work in Spain via your employer (autorización de residencia y trabajo por cuenta ajena de duración determinada). Plan to apply for your visa within 90 days of your planned arrival in Spain.

What documents do I need for the employment work with a fixed-term contract?

  • Completed visa form. You can download it here.  
  • Recent passport photograph with white background
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit in the country you live in. Plus photocopy.
  • Copy of the authorisation for you to work and live in Spain (autorización de residencia y trabajo por cuenta ajena de duración determinada).
  • Copy of the employment contract submitted when the above authorisation was granted. The contract must carry the Immigration Office stamp.
  • Certificate of criminal record* issued in the country or countries where you have lived for the last five years. The certificate must be no more than three months old.
  • Declaration signed by you that you will return to your country of origin once the fixed-term contract comes to an end.
  • Medical certificate* issued no later than three months before you apply for your visa stating that you have no diseases that may have serious health repercussions in accordance with 2005 International Health Regulations.  

* Certificates must be translated into Spanish (sworn translation) and carry the Hague Apostille or be legalised the Spanish consulate (except documents issued by Spain, which will not require to be legalised).

What happens after I get my Spanish work visa?

You must enter Spain within one month and then you have one month from the date of entry to apply for your residence permit (TIE/ Tarjeta de Identidad de Extranjero) at the Immigration Office or Police Station in the area you live.

Self-employment Work Visa

If you’re a non-EEA national and plan to work in Spain for yourself or to set up your own business, you need to apply for the self-employment work visa. This visa type has a lot of paperwork related to your proposed business and we recommend preparing the documentation well in advance of your visa application.

Find out more about setting up a company in Spain

What’s the first step to applying for a self-employment work visa?

You first need to apply for the initial authorisation to work as self-employed in Spain, known as autorización de residencia temporal y trabajo por cuenta propia in Spanish. You should apply for this at the Spanish consulate.

What paperwork do I need to submit for the initial authorisation?

There are two sorts of paperwork: consulate and business-related.

For the consulate:

  • Complete form EX-07 Autorización de residencia temporal y trabajo por cuenta ajena and pay the corresponding fees.
  • You also need to show a passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. You need a photocopy of all passport pages.

For your business:

  • A detailed business plan. This should include expected investment, projected profits and if applicable, the number of jobs you will create. You must also show proof of sufficient funds to set up your business projects. The funds may be your own or from investments or loans from third parties. ‘Sufficient’ means enough to set up and maintain yourself employed for an indefinite period.
  • Securement of premises. If you are using premises, you must provide proof of work permits or licences for the building, opening and operation of the planned project or professional activity. If you are in the process of securement, you must show proof of the applications you have filed with the appropriate authorities.
  • Qualifications. Proof that you have the professional qualifications or sufficient experience for the activity you plan to set up. If necessary, you must show proof that you have registered with the appropriate professional body.
  • Living costs. You also need to show proof that you have sufficient funds to live on (food and lodging) while you are in Spain. If you plan to obtain these funds from your self-employed activity, they will be evaluated after discounting the necessary costs to cover the maintenance of professional activity.

What happens when the initial authorisation is approved?

When your initial authorisation to work as self-employed in Spain is approved, you must apply in person for the self employment work visa within one month of the date of notification.

What paperwork do I need for a self-employment work visa in Spain?

You need the following documents:

  • Completed visa form. You can download a copy here.
  • Recent passport photograph with white background.
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit in the country you live in. Plus photocopy.
  • Copy of the authorisation for you to work and live in Spain (autorización de residencia temporal y trabajo por cuenta propia).
  • Certificate of criminal record* issued in the country or countries where you have lived for the last five years. The certificate must be no more than three months old.
  • Medical certificate* issued no later than three months before you apply for your visa stating that you have no diseases that may have serious health repercussions in accordance with 2005 International Health Regulations.  

* Certificates must be translated into Spanish (sworn translation) and carry the Hague Apostille or be legalised the Spanish consulate (except documents issued by Spain, which will not require to be legalised).

What happens after I get my Spanish self-employment work visa?

You must enter Spain within one month and then you have one month from the date of entry to apply for your residence permit (TIE/ Tarjeta de Identidad de Extranjero) at the Immigration Office or Police Station in the area you live.

Golden Visa – Visas for investors and entrepreneurs in Spain

If you’re a non-EEA national and wish to obtain a Spanish residence permit, the investor-entrepreneur visa is an option you may wish to consider.

Popularly known as the ‘Golden Visa’, this visa allows you to gain a residence permit in Spain through investment in property, shares or bonds or in a business venture in Spain.

In this section, we answer questions about the Golden Visa and explain the requirements to obtain it.

What are the basic requirements for the Golden Visa in Spain?

You must be at least 18 and a non-EEA national. You must also not be in Spain illegally or listed as an illegal citizen in countries that Spain has an agreement with.

Can I apply for myself and dependents?

Yes, like other visas in Spain, you may apply for your dependents at the same time as you make your application or afterwards. Your dependents may be:

  • Spouse or legal partner.
  • Children.
  • Parents.

Do I have to apply in person for a Golden Visa?

No, you may name a representative to apply on your behalf – your allocated representative will need to show notarised authorisation.

When should I apply for this visa?

You should make your application at a Spanish Consulate in your home country within 90 days of the date you plan to move to Spain.

What are the categories of investment and entrepreneurship for the Golden Visa?

This visa has three categories – real estate investment, capital investment and entrepreneurs – and you need to meet the requirements for one of them in order to qualify for a visa.

Real estate investment for the Golden Visa

You must purchase real estate in Spain in your name with a minimum value of €500,000. This amount cannot include any financial loans or mortgages, although any investment higher than €500,000 may be covered by a loan.

How do I prove my investment?

  • If you have already purchased the property, you must provide a certificate from the Land Registry showing your ownership.

The certificate must be issued no more than three months before your visa application.

  • If you are in the process of buying the property, you may present the purchase contract as proof plus a certificate from a Spanish financial entity confirming that you have deposited at least €500,000. In this case, the investor visa is valid for a maximum of six months.

Capital investment for the Golden Visa

You have two options for capital investment in Spain when applying for this category of the Golden Visa:

  • Investment of a minimum of €2 million in Spanish government debt securities.
  • Investment of a minimum of Є1 million in stocks or shares belonging to Spanish companies, closed-end investment funds, venture capital funds or bank deposits in Spanish financial entities.

How do I prove my investment?

The documentation required depends on the type of investment as follows:

  • Government debt securities – a certificate from the financial entity or the Bank of Spain stating that you are the sole owner of the investment for at least five years.
  • Unquoted stocks or shares – a copy of the investment statement filed with the Spanish Registry of Foreign Investments.
  • Quoted stocks or shares – a certificate from a financial broker registered with the CMNV (National Securities Market Commission) or the Bank of Spain. The certificate should state that the investment is for the purposes of an investor visa.  
  • Bank deposits – a certificate from the financial entity stating that you are the sole holder of the deposit.

The Entrepreneur visa

This visa is for entrepreneurs who have a business project they wish to invest in to set up in Spain. The project must be deemed and proved of general interest.

Investors may also apply for this visa if they wish to stay in Spain for one year with the sole or main purpose of making preliminary arrangements for developing a business or enterprise in the country.

How do I prove my entrepreneurial project?

The project should be to carry out innovative activity or special economic interest to Spain as viewed favourably by the Economic and Commercial Office in the location where you wish to set up the project.

If the project has several business partners, the involvement of each will be evaluated by the

How do I prove my entrepreneurial investment?

You need a favourable report from the Economic and Commercial Office in the location where you wish to invest showing that your business plan is of general interest.

You should also make significant capital investment in the project.

Highly Qualified Professional Visas

A highly qualified professional (HQP) visa is issued to non-EEA nationals who have been contracted for a position within a company that requires a high level of skills and/or academic qualifications. Examples of such positions are high-level managerial posts and jobs with specialist technical knowledge.

If you have received a job offer in Spain that fits these characteristics, then you need to apply for an HQP visa. It allows you to live and work in Spain with your family members. The procedure for application  is as follows.

What is the first step?

An HQP visa is only issued to non-EEA individuals who already have permission a favourable answer to their initial request for residence. This document is known in Spanish as a resolución de autorización de residencia inicial para profesionales altamente cualificados.

In addition, you cannot be illegally present in Spain or be listed as undesirable in the countries with which Spain has an agreement to this effect.

Who can accompany me on a Highly Qualified Professional visa in Spain?

You may live in Spain with the following family members:

  • Spouse or civil partner
  • Children under 18 or financially dependent on you.
  • Your parents.

Note that each family holder accompanying you must apply for a visa and include their favourable answer to their initial request for residence.

Do I have to apply in person for this visa in Spain?

No, you may apply through a representation as long as they have notarised authorisation.

What documents do I need to apply for the Highly Qualified Professional Visa?

  • The completed visa form. You can download a copy here. http://www.exteriores.gob.es/Consulados/LONDRES/en/Consulado/Documents/Solicitud%20nacional%20ES.pdf 
  • A recent passport photograph with white background
  • Your passport or travel document recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of one year and at least two blank pages. Plus a photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit and photocopy.
  • The favourable answer to your initial request for residence (resolución de autorización de residencia inicial para profesionales altamente cualificados).
  • Certificate of criminal record* from the country or countries where you have lived for the five years prior to the visa application. The certificate should be no more than three months old.

What documents do family members need?

Certificates* that prove the family tie – for example, marriage or civil partnership certificate, birth certificate…

*All documents need to be translated into Spain (a sworn translations) and legalised through the consulate of the issuing country or carry the Hague Apostille.

Residence Visa with Working Permit Exemption (more than 90 days)

If you’re a non-EEA national and wish to live in Spain for longer than 90 days while carrying out certain activities, you may be exempt from requiring a work permit. The following section lists the approved activities and explains the process for applying for a residence visa with work permit exemption in Spain.

If your professional activity means that your stay in Spain will be for less than  90 days, you need to apply for a C-type work visa.

Which activities qualify for a Spanish residence visa with work permit exemption?

The following list includes professions and activities that are deemed exempt from work permit requirements in Spain and allow you to stay in the country for more than 90 days. For each one, we have also listed the documentation required as proof of your activity.

Technician or scientist

Invited or contracted by the Spanish authorities or a public institution to promote or develop research because of your knowledge, specialisation, experience or scientific practices.  

Documentation required: an invitation or contract from the organisation with a description of the project and the professional background required to undertake the research.

Teacher, technician, researcher or scientist

Invited or contracted by a Spanish university to carry out teaching, research or academic activity.

Documentation required: an invitation or contract from the university for the above-mentioned activity.

Managerial, academic or research staff at cultural or education centres

Visiting Spain to carry out cultural or educational programme from your country. The centre you come from may be private or state-owned, but must have an established reputation and be officially recognised by Spain. The studies and academic qualifications issued by your programmes must be valid in the country your centre is based in.

Documentation required: proof of the validity of academic qualifications issued in Spain and contract for your management or teaching activity. If the centre you come in is privately-owned, you need to show proof of its official recognition by Spain.

Civil or military official from foreign administrations

Invited by the Spanish authorities to come to Spain to carry out activities under co-operational agreements.

Documentation required: a certificate issued by the corresponding foreign administration justifying the co-operational activity.

Media correspondent

Journalists from foreign media who carry out their activity in Spain.

Documentation required: accreditation from the Spanish authorities to carry out correspondence in Spain.

Artist

Whose performance in Spain will be no longer than 5 consecutive days or 20 days within a period of over 90 days within 6 months.  

Documentation required: an employment contract for the artistic activity and list of permits and/or licences needed for its development. You should indicate what stage the permit/licence applications are at and provide proof that you have applied for them.

Religious minister or member of a religious order, hierarchy or community.

All activities to be carried out in Spain must be strictly religious, contemplative or part of the statutory purposes of a religious work. You cannot carry out any work not included within these. You must also fulfill one of the following requirements:

  • Your church or community must be registered in the Registry of Religious Orders with the Ministry of Justice. OR
  • You must be a minister of religion or a member of the church hierarchy or a religious order.

In addition, your religious order or community must meet all your living costs as well as your social security costs.

Documentation required: a certificate from the Spanish Ministry of Justice or a certificate from your religious order or community together with a copy of the order’s statutes.

Member of an internationally recognised trade union or business organisation

The activity you carry out in Spain must be limited to the exercise of your role as a member of the trade union or business organisation.

Documentation required: a certificate issued by the trade union or business organisation.

When should I apply for the residence visa with work permit exemption?

You should apply for the visa The visa can be applied for up to 90 days before the desired date of entry into Spain.

What documentation do I need to apply for a residence visa in Spain with work permit exemption?

  • Completed visa form. You can download a copy here.
  • Completed form EX-09 ‘Autorización de estancia o residencia temporal con excepción de autorización de trabajo’.
  • The documentation proving your status as one of the professionals (see the above list).
  • A recent passport photograph with white background.
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit in the country you live in. Plus photocopy.
  • Certificate of criminal record* issued in the country or countries where you have lived for the last five years. The certificate must be no more than three months old.
  • Medical certificate* issued no later than three months before you apply for your visa stating that you have no diseases that may have serious health repercussions in accordance with 2005 International Health Regulations.

* Certificates must be translated into Spanish (sworn translation) and carry the Hague Apostille or be legalised the Spanish consulate (except documents issued by Spain, which will not require to be legalised).

What happens after I get my Spanish residence visa?

You must enter Spain within one month and then you have one month from the date of entry to apply for your residence permit (TIE/ Tarjeta de Identidad de Extranjero) at the Immigration Office or Police Station in the area you live.

Residence and Work Visa for Provision of Services in Spain

If your company transfers you to work in a company in Spain or to one of its offices in Spain, you will need a residence and work visa for transnational provision of services. You’ll also need this visa if a temporary employment company moves you to a Spanish company or a company with its main activities in Spain. This visa is known as visado de residencia y trabajo por prestación transnacional de servicios in Spanish.

When should I apply for this visa?

You should make your application up to 90 days before you plan to enter Spain.

What’s the first step for this visa?

You first need to apply for an authorisation to live and work in Spain for provision of services. Your employer is usually in charge of this application, called Autorización de residencia y trabajo en el marco de prestaciones transnacionales de servicios.

To obtain the authorisation, you or your employer need to present the following documentation:

  • Copy of the contract proving you are providing the services in Spain.
  • If applicable, proof of your training and qualifications that show you are suitable for the post.
  • A report of the activities you will carry out when you’re in Spain.
  • If you are transferring to a branch or sister company, proof that the companies belong to the same group.
  • If your employer alleges that there are no EEA nationals in Spain who can provide your services, a certificate from the competent state employment service should state this.
  • Documentation that identifies the company and its tax domicile.
  • If applicable, documentation showing that you are a legal resident in the country where the visa application is made.
  • A certificate from the social security authorities in the country of origin stating that you will continue to be subject to its legislation if there is an applicable international social security agreement or a certificate appointing a legal representative for the company to comply with social security obligations in Spain.

What happens when I get the authorisation for the transnational provision of services visa?

Once you receive the authorisation, you have one month from the date of notification to apply for your visa.

What documentation do I need for the visa itself?

  • Completed visa form. You can download a copy here.
  • Recent passport photo with white background.
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of one year and at least two blank pages. Plus a photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit and photocopy.
  • The favourable answer to your initial request for authorisation (resolución de autorización de residencia y trabajo en el marco de prestaciones transnacionales de servicios).
  • Certificate of criminal record* from the country or countries where you have lived for the five years prior to the visa application. The certificate should be no more than three months old.
  • Medical certificate* issued no later than three months before you apply for your visa stating that you have no diseases that may have serious health repercussions in accordance with 2005 International Health Regulations.

*All documents need to be translated into Spain (a sworn translations) and legalised through the consulate of the issuing country or carry the Hague Apostille.

What should I do when I get my visa?

When your application is accepted and you have your visa stamp in your passport, you have one month to enter Spain. You must then apply for your residence permit (TIE – Tarjeta de Identidad de Extranjero) within a month of your arrival in Spain.

Inter-company Transfer Visa

If you’re a non-EEA national and wish to work or undertake professional training with a company or group of companies established in Spain, you need an inter-company transfer visa. This section explains how to apply for one.

What are the first steps?

First of all, the company you wish to work for or train with must apply for authorisation on your behalf. This is known as an autorización de residencia inicial por traslado intraempresarial in Spanish and the company applies for it at the Spanish Migration Office (Dirección General de Migraciones).

When the authorisation is granted, you may apply for the inter-company transfer visa.

How do I apply for the inter-company transfer visa?

You should make the application at a Spanish consulate in your home country and provide the following documentation:

  • Completed visa form. You can download a copy here.  
  • A recent passport photograph with white background.
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit in the country you live in. Plus photocopy.
  • The authorisation for you to work or train in Spain (autorización de residencia inicial por traslado intraempresarial).
  • Certificate of criminal record* issued in the country or countries where you have lived for the last five years. The certificate must be no more than three months old.

* Certificates must be translated into Spanish (sworn translation) and carry the Hague Apostille or be legalised the Spanish consulate (except documents issued by Spain, which will not require to be legalised).

Can my family come to Spain with me?

Yes, you may take the following relatives with you:

Spouse or legal partner.

Children (under 18 or financially dependent on you).

Ascendants (dependent on you).

How can my family come with me?

You need to follow the family reunification visa process. Link to family reunification visa

National or EU Researcher

Another type of long-term visa in Spain for non-EEA nationals is the one that includes researchers whose work will be carried out in Spain or the European Union.

What is the first step to applying for a national or EU researcher visa in Spain?

To apply for this visa, you first need a favourable answer to your initial request for residence as a national or EU researcher. This is known as a resolución de autorización de residencia inicial para investigación nacional o UE in Spanish.

Can my family accompany me to Spain if I get a national or EU researcher visa?

Yes, they may as long as they have approval for the initial request for residence to accompany you. You may live and carry out research in Spain with the following family members:

Spouse or civil partner.

Children under 18 or financially dependent on you.

Your parents.

Do I have to apply for the national or EU researcher visa in Spain in person?

No, you may appoint a representative to apply on your behalf as long as they have notarised authorisation from you.

When should I apply for this visa?

You should make your application up to 90 days before you wish to enter Spain.

What documents do I need to apply for a national or EU researcher visa?

  • The completed visa form. You can download it here.
  • A recent passport photograph with white background
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of one year and at least two blank pages. Plus a photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit and photocopy.
  • The favourable answer to your initial request for residence (resolución de autorización de residencia inicial para investigación nacional o UE).
  • Certificate of criminal record* from the country or countries where you have lived for the five years prior to the visa application. The certificate should be no more than three months old.

What documents do my family members need?

Certificates* that prove the family relationship – for example, marriage or civil partnership certificate, birth certificate…

*All documents need to be translated into Spain (a sworn translations) and legalised through the consulate of the issuing country or carry the Hague Apostille.

Internship Visa

If you’re a non-EEA national and wish to take up an intern post in Spain, you will need an internship visa (visado de residencia inicial para prácticas). The following information tells you how to apply.

What are the requirements for an internship visa in Spain?

You are only eligible for this type of visa in Spain in the following instances:

  • You are at least 18 years AND
  • If you have obtained a higher education degree within the last two years for your application.
    OR
  • You are currently studying for a higher education degree.

What’s the first step?

The entity where you intend to undertake your internship must apply for an authorisation for a residence permit for intern purposes on your behalf. This is known as an autorización de residencia inicial para prácticas. When you have this authorisation, you can apply for the internship visa.

When should I apply?

You should make your application up to 90 days before you plan to travel to Spain.

How do I apply for an internship visa in Spain?

You apply at the Spanish consulate in your home country with the following documentation:

  • Completed visa form. You can download a copy here.
  • The documentation proving you have authorisation (autorización de residencia inicial para prácticas).
  • A recent passport photograph with white background.
  • Your passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  • Certificate of criminal record* issued in the country or countries where you have lived for the last five years. The certificate must be no more than three months old.

* Certificates must be translated into Spanish (sworn translation) and carry the Hague Apostille or be legalised the Spanish consulate (except documents issued by Spain, which will not require to be legalised).

Student Visa

If your stay in Spain involving any sort of studying for longer than 90 days at a time, you will need a student visa. If your study stay is less than 90 days, you should apply for a Schengen Tourism Visa link to section above.

Who needs a Student Visa in Spain?

Any non-EEA national planning to stay in period for more than 90 days with the sole purpose of carrying out the following activities (none of which involve paid employment):

  • Studying or extending your current studies in an authorised educational establishment in Spain, for the completion of a complete programme, leading to a degree or certificate of studies.
  • Undertaking research activity or education (that is not included in the National or EU Researcher category link to section). Note that visas are only issued for research at a university, a centre belonging to the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas or a public or private R&D institution.
  • Participating in a student mobility programme that follows a secondary education programme within a recognised educational or scientific establishment and that takes responsibility for the student during their stay and organises the host family or institution.
  • Undertaking an unpaid internship at a public or private organisation and under the proviso of a signed agreement.
  • Taking part in a volunteer scheme with objectives of general interest and with the proviso of a signed agreement with the organisation responsible for the programme that has civil liability insurance for its activities.

When should I apply for a Student Visa?

You can apply up to 90 days before you plan to enter Spain. It’s advisable to have an appointment with the Consulate at least 30 days in advance because regional authorities need to be consulted about the place where the studies are going to be carried out.

Do I have to apply in person?

No, a legal representative (with authorisation signed in the presence of a Notary Public) may apply on your behalf. If you’re under age, your parents or legal guardians may make the application for you.

Do I have to collect the Student Visa in person?

Yes, and you must do this within two months from the date of notification. If you fail to do, the authorities will presume that you have renounced the visa and close your application.

What do I need to apply for a Student Visa in Spain?

  1. National visa form complete, dated and signed.
  2. Recent passport photograph with white background.
  3. Valid passport for the entire duration of stay, with at least two blank pages.
  4. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  5. Valid UK residence permit and photocopy. Visa applications submitted by non-residents who are in the UK on a C-Visit stay visa will not be accepted.
  6. Specific documentation for each type of stay, where the start and end dates must be specified, as well as the contact details of each centre as follows:

Studying or extending your current studies – documents certifying your admittance to the educational institution; a document stating the subjects and topic of studies (minimum 20); and proof you have paid full tuition fees.

Undertaking research activity or education – documents certifying your admittance to the institution.

Participating in a student mobility programme – documents certifying your admittance to the programme and a secondary school or officially recognised centre; a document stating that the organiser takes responsibility during the stay, particularly for the cost of studies, living expenses and return to their home country; and proof that of hosting by a family or institution organised by the programme.

Undertaking an unpaid internship – documents proving your admittance to the company or recognised professional training centre; and a copy of the agreement signed with the company or centre.

Taking part in as a volunteer – signed documents describing the activities and conditions of the scheme and resources available to cover travel and board and lodging.

  1. Proof of financial means to cover the living expenses and return journey for you. In 2021, this is €564.90 a month unless the accommodation for your entire stay has been paid for in advance.

If you have dependents, you will also need €423.67 per month for the first dependent and €282.45 for any others unless you prove that you have paid for your accommodation for your entire stay in advance.

To prove you had sufficient funds, you must present one of the following:

– A letter from the educational institution stating that all your costs for board and lodging have been paid for. This information is often included in the letter of acceptance.

– Proof of a scholarship covering the period that you will be in Spain.

– A notarised document signed by your parents or legal guardians certifying that they will cover all your costs of study in Spain. You need to accompany the document with your birth certificate or legal custody, the parent’s or guardian’s passport, a letter from their employer stating how long they have been employed and their salary, plus six months of bank statements (originals and stamped by the bank).

– Proof of funds by submitting six months of bank statements (originals and stamped by the bank).

  1. Proof of health insurance with a minimum €30,000 international cover for the period of your stay and repatriation in case of death.
  2. Medical certificate issued no later than three months before you apply for your visa stating that you have no diseases that may have serious health repercussions in accordance with 2005 International Health Regulations. If it isn’t in Spanish, the certificate must be accompanied by a sworn translation into Spanish.
  3. If you are over 18, a certificate of criminal record issued by the country or countries where you have lived during the five years preceding the date of the visa application. The certificate may not be older than three months.

When I apply for a Student Visa, should my dependents apply at the same time?

Yes, they must submit their applications at the same time. A spouse or civil partner must present the marriage or civil partnership certificate and children, their birth certificate.

You can read the full list of requirements (in Spanish and English) for the Student Visa here.

Au-pair Visa

If you’re a non-EEA national and planning to come to Spain to work as an au-pair, you need to know the following.

What are the requirements?

You must be between 17 and 30 and may only work as an au-pair for one year.

What sort of visa do I need to work as an au-pair in Spain?

The visa is the Student Visa with the same required documents plus an au-pair agreement signed by you and your employees.

Find out what you need for a Student Visa in Spain. Link to Student Visa section

What must the au-pair agreement include?

  • Address and description of where you will be living with the family. Your living space must have a certain degree of independence.
  • The contract you sign with your employees must contain the following information:
  • Duration of your contract (maximum one year) plus start and end dates.
  • Engagement in household tasks for no more than five hours a day.
  • Provision for at least one complete day off a week. At least one of the free days of the month must be Sunday.
  • The monthly amount you will receive as pocket money.
  • The circumstances under which the agreement may be terminated by either party with two weeks’ notice.

Language Assistant Visa

If you’re a non-EEA national and plan to work in Spain as a language assistant, you will need a Student Visa.

Do I need any additional documentation?

Yes, you must show proof of confirmation of your appointment by the institution or authority in Spain.

Find out what you need for a Student Visa in Spain. Link to Student Visa section

Family Reunification Visa in Spain

If you already have a visa to live and work in Spain and wish your family to join you, you must apply for a family reunification visa. Note that you can only apply for this visa if you have already lived in Spain legally for one year and have at least one more year validity on your residence permit.

What’s the first step to applying for a family reunification visa in Spain?

You should first apply for authorisation for a residence visa for family reunification purposes. This is known as an autorización de residencia temporal por reagrupación familiar in Spanish. You should apply for this at the immigration office or police station in your place of residence.

You need the following documentation :

Completed form EX02. You can download a copy here.

  • A copy of your passport.
  • Proof that you have employment and/or sufficient funds to support your family in Spain. Examples of this include:
    If you are employed, a copy of your contract and your latest tax declaration in Spain.
    If you are self-employed, proof of your activity and your latest tax declaration in Spain.
    If you don’t work, a bank certificate showing you have sufficient funds.
  • Proof that you have adequate accommodation for your family, for example, title deeds to a property in your name or rental contract. They should state the number of rooms in the property.
  • A copy of all the family members’ passports.
  • Proof of your family ties, e.g. marriage or civil partnership certificate*, birth certificate* etc.
  • Sworn declaration by your spouse or partner that they do not live in Spain with any other spouse or partner. And if they were married before, a certificate stating the situation of the previous spouse and children.
  • If there are children from a previous marriage, a sworn declaration that the spouse or partner has custody or that the other parent authorises the children’s residence in Spain.
  • Proof of sufficient funds if the children are over 18 and not financially independent.
  • Proof of sufficient health care cover (provision under Spanish social security or private health insurance).

What happens after that?

When you receive authorisation for family reunification, your family members have two months from the date of notification to apply for their family reunifications visas to live in Spain. They should apply at the Spanish consulate in their home country and present the following documentation:

  • Completed visa form. You can download a copy here.
  • A recent passport photograph with white background.
  • Their passport or travel document, recognised as valid in Spain. It must have a minimum validity of the duration of the stay and at least two blank pages. Photocopy of all passport pages.
  • If applicable, your residence permit in the country they live in. Plus photocopy.
  • Copy of the authorisation letter issued by the Spanish authorities.
  • Original and copy of documents* proving family ties.
  • Copy of your resident permit in Spain.
  • Certificate of criminal record* issued in the country or countries where you have lived for the last five years. The certificate must be no more than three months old.

Medical certificate* issued no later than three months before you apply for your visa stating that you have no diseases that may have serious health repercussions in accordance with 2005 International Health Regulations.

* Certificates must be translated into Spanish (sworn translation) and carry the Hague Apostille or be legalised the Spanish consulate (except documents issued by Spain, which will not require to be legalised).

What happens after I get my Spanish residence visa?

When your family members receive notification that their family reunification visa in Spain has been approved, they have two months to go in person to the consulate to collect it. Once the stamp is in their visa, they must enter Spain within three months.

They then have one month from the date of entry to apply for their residence permit (TIE/ Tarjeta de Identidad de Extranjero) at the Immigration Office or Police Station in the area you live.

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